Ginkgo Biloba

According to some studies, Ginkgo can improve attention in healthy individuals.[1],[2] In one such study, the effect was relatively quick and peaked 2.5 hours after consumption.[3]

One study suggests that Ginkgo Biloba's effect on cognition may be attributable to its inhibitory effect on norepinephrine reuptake.[4] It acts as a reuptake inhibitor for the neurotransmitters norepinephrine (noradrenaline)[5] and epinephrine (adrenaline)[6] by blocking the action of the norepinephrine transporter.

The World Health Organization[7] reports the medicinal uses of Ginkgo Biloba supported by clinical data include treatment of the effects mild to moderate cerebrovascular insufficiency.[8] Cerebrovascular insufficiency – insufficient blood flow to the brain – may manifest itself as memory deficit, disturbed concentration or headaches.

In vitro studies have demonstrated Ginkgo Biloba extracts scavenge free radicals.[9-13] This antioxidant action of Ginkgo Biloba extract may prolong the half-life of endotheliumderived relaxing factor by scavenging superoxide anions.[12],[13] The free-radical scavenging activity of Ginkgo Biloba appear to be aided by its flavonoid and terpenoid constituents.[13]

Each serving of Elebra contains Ginkgo Biloba, and is manufactured in the USA at a cGMP facility that has an "A" rating (the highest possible) from the National Nutritional Foods Association. We stand behind our product and offer a 100% Money Back Guarantee.

References
1. Elsabagh, Sarah; Hartley, David E.; Ali, Osama; Williamson, Elizabeth M.; File, Sandra E. (2005). "Differential
    cognitive effects of Ginkgo biloba after acute and chronic treatment in healthy young volunteers".
    Psychopharmacology 179 (2): 437–46.
2. “Herbal remedies 'boost brain power'”. BBC News, Health. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/713087.stm.
    Retrieved 2011-10-5.
3. Kennedy, David O.; Scholey, Andrew B.; Wesnes, Keith A. (2000). "The dose-dependent cognitive effects of
    acute administration of Ginkgo biloba to healthy young volunteers". Psychopharmacology 151 (4): 416–23.
    doi:10.1007/s002130000501. PMID 11026748
4. doi:10.1016/j.phrs.2009.02.012. PMID 19427589
5. "Norepinephrine definition". dictionary.reference.com. Retrieved 2011-10-5.
6. Berecek Kh, B. M. (1982). "Evidence for a neurotransmitter role for epinephrine derived from the adrenal
    medulla". Am J Physiol 242 (4): H593–H601. PMID 6278965.
7. http://apps.who.int/medicinedocs/en/d/Js2200e/18.html#Js2200e.18. Retrieved 2011-10-5.
8. DeFeudis FV. Ginkgo biloba extract (egb 761): pharmacological activities and clinical applications. Paris,
    Elsevier, Editions Scientifiques, 1991:1187.
9. Pincemail J et al. In: Farkas L, Gabor M, Kallay F, eds. Flavonoids and bioflavonoids. Szeged, Hungary,
    1985:423.
10. Barth SA et al. Influences of Ginkgo biloba on cyclosporin induced lipid peroxidation in human liver
    microsomes in comparison to vitamin E, glutathione and Nacetylcysteine. Biochemical pharmacology, 1991,
    41:1521–1526.
11. Pincemail J et al. Ginkgo biloba extract inhibits oxygen species production generated by phorbol myristate
    acetate stimulated human leukocytes. Experientia, 1987, 43:181–184.
12. Pincemail J, Dupuis M, Nasr C. Superoxide anion scavenging effect and superoxide dismutase activity of
    Ginkgo biloba extract. Experientia, 1989, 45:708– 712.
13. Robak J, Gryglewski RJ. Flavonoids are scavengers of superoxide anions. Biochemical pharmacology, 1988,
    37:837–841.